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Republicans Made Gains Down-Ballot In California. What Does It Mean For The Party’s Future In The State?




Republican Congressional candidate in California's 39th District Young Kim (R) is surrounded by supporters and media as she arrives at an election night event in Rowland Heights, California on November 6, 2018.
Republican Congressional candidate in California's 39th District Young Kim (R) is surrounded by supporters and media as she arrives at an election night event in Rowland Heights, California on November 6, 2018.
ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

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Although Joe Biden won California by nearly 30 percent of the vote, the Republican Party saw gains down-ballot in the otherwise heavily Democratic state.

Republicans will likely win back as many as four of seven House seats that Democrats had flipped in 2018. Additionally, voters did not vote in favor of business tax and rent control measures, and voted down an attempt to reinstate affirmative action. Democrats have a supermajority in the California legislature and hold every statewide office, but the recent advances by Republicans show that the party is not dead in the state, and could find greater influence in coming years.

Does this signal a shift in the state that may develop in years to come? We’re hearing more now on AirTalk. Questions? Give us a call at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Jessica Millan Patterson, chairwoman of the California Republican Party; she tweets @millanpatterson

Pete Peterson, dean of the School of Public Policy and senior fellow at The Davenport Institute at Pepperdine University; he tweets @Pete4CA