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In American Offices, Remote Work Is Now The Norm— And That’s A Relief For Many Autistic People




In this file photo taken on May 15, 2020 Manon, employee of global PR group Sagarmatha - Hopscotch, connects with her colleagues in Paris via videochat at her home office (teletravail) in the French riviera city of Nice.
In this file photo taken on May 15, 2020 Manon, employee of global PR group Sagarmatha - Hopscotch, connects with her colleagues in Paris via videochat at her home office (teletravail) in the French riviera city of Nice.
VALERY HACHE/AFP via Getty Images

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The style of social interactions inherent to many offices and workplaces can be difficult to navigate for some people on the autism spectrum.

That’s part of the reason why, when offices shifted to remote work last year, they became more hospitable to neurodivergence. While many disabled people and disability advocates have pushed for remote work options for years, it only became normalized when workplaces that could move online were forced to with the COVID-19 pandemic. While employees with autism or ADHD may have struggled in office environments designed for neurotypical people (with distractions, social pressures, ambient noises and other stimuli), working from home allows people to create environments more conducive to the best way they work. Working collaboratively online can also allow people to take more time to think and process their responses, an opportunity not necessarily allowed for in a room full of people. Additionally, with advances in workplace technology, opportunities to work from home are more feasible than ever for the long-term.

Are you an autistic person that has found benefits in working fully remote? What has the experience been like for you? We want to hear from you! Give us a call at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Alexandra Samuel, technology researcher and writer for the Wall Street Journal, and author of the recent piece “Remote Work Could Revolutionize Jobs for Autistic People”; her upcoming book is "Remote, Inc: How To Thrive At Work...Wherever You Are" is out in April; she tweets @awsamuel

Crystal Lee, clinical psychologist specializing in adult autism and ADHD at L.A. Concierge Psychologist, a local private practice; @DrCrystalLee