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State Of The Arts: As TV, Film Production Ramp Up, What Will Stay And What Will Change On Set




View of the stage and set up ahead of the 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards on February 25, 2021 in New York City.
View of the stage and set up ahead of the 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards on February 25, 2021 in New York City.
ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

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As coronavirus case numbers continue to decline and more Californians receive shots in their arms, like so many other industries, film and television production are starting back up in larger numbers.

In late January, unions representing actors and crewmembers on film and TV sets announced they’d agreed to lift a halt on production, allowing it to resume on February 1. Earlier this month, Film L.A., the organization that oversees and issues filming permits in Los Angeles, reported a 43 percent increase in permits from last month, a sign that we are indeed seeing productions start back up in earnest. But there’s still a long way to go before production slates have returned to normal, and in the meantime employees who worked on film and TV sets pre-pandemic and are now maybe going back to work will likely find that a lot has changed in the way film and TV is shot now.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll conclude our weeklong “State of the Arts” series by taking a look at the state of film and television production, and how it will look as California continues to move down the color tier ladder.

Guests:

Anousha Sakoui, entertainment industry writer for the Los Angeles Times who’s been following this report; she tweets @anoushasakoui

Dominic Patten, senior editor at Deadline Hollywood where he is a TV critic and covers the business of Hollywood; he tweets @DeadlineDominic