Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 am - 12 pm

Explaining Biden’s Massive Infrastructure Plan And How It’s Likely To Fare In Congress




US President Joe Biden signs the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Extension Act of 2021 into law at the White House in Washington, DC, on March 30, 2021.
US President Joe Biden signs the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Extension Act of 2021 into law at the White House in Washington, DC, on March 30, 2021.
JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Listen to story

19:16
Download this story 18MB

President Joe Biden is aiming for summer passage of an infrastructure plan that is expected to cost more than $3 trillion, and the White House hopes to take a more deliberate and collaborative approach with the contentious Congress than it did on the COVID-19 rescue package, officials said Monday.

The president will announce parts of his “Build Back Better” package Wednesday in Pittsburgh. Sweeping in scope, the ambitious plan aims to make generational investments in infrastructure, revive domestic manufacturing, combat climate change and keep the United States competitive with China, according to the officials. It could include $3 trillion in tax increases.

The final price tag is in flux but was expected to be between $3 trillion and $4 trillion. One White House official said Monday night that it may end up being closer to $3 trillion.

Though the White House is emphasizing the urgency, it also insists this will not be considered an emergency response like the $1.9 trillion virus relief bill that Biden signed into law over Republican objections earlier this month. The administration wants to see progress on the new legislation by Memorial Day and have it passed over the summer, White House officials said.

“The president has a plan to fix our infrastructure and a plan to pay for it,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said. “But we certainly expect to have the discussion with members of Congress, as we move forward, about areas where they agree, where they disagree, where they would like to see greater emphasis or not.”

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Mario Parker, White House reporter for Bloomberg News who’s following Biden’s infrastructure plan; he tweets @MarioDParker 

Susan McWilliams Barndt, chair and professor of politics at Pomona College and editor of American Political Thought journal