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A Police Officer Was Fired For Intervening In Colleague’s Chokehold In 2006. Why It Matters Today And What It Means For How We Look At Excessive Force




A member of a police patrol conducts a search on a man as one of his colleague stands guard with a body camera attached to the shoulder on February 15, 2017 in Marseille.
A member of a police patrol conducts a search on a man as one of his colleague stands guard with a body camera attached to the shoulder on February 15, 2017 in Marseille.
BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images

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A judge has ruled that the firing of a police officer, who’s black, in 2006 was wrong. Cariole Horne intervened when she saw a fellow officer put a man in a chokehold. Horne was fired soon after the incident, but she didn’t give up the fight. 

According to the New York Times, the court ruling rewrites the ending of Horne’s career in the police force, giving her access to back pay and other benefits. Today on AirTalk, we talk with a reporter who’s been following the latest on Horne’s case and discuss why it’s taken so long to get to this point. Plus, we discuss what it means for the future of reporting excessive force behaviors in the police force, all as eyes are on Minneapolis during the trial of Derek Chauvin for the killing of George Floyd. Do you have thoughts or questions? Call 866-893-5722.

Guests: 

Jonah E. Bromwich, a courts reporter for the New York Times, his latest piece is “Court Vindicates Black Officer Fired for Stopping Colleague’s Chokehold;” he tweets @Jonesieman

Tommy W. Tunson, retired chief of police in California with 30 years experience in law enforcement in cities including Calexico, Coachella, South Gate and Arvin;  he's now a criminal justice professor at Bakersfield College