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California’s Proposed Plan To Overhaul K-12 Math Has Set Off The State’s Newest Education Controversy




Sixth grade students attend their Middle School class on May 14, 2014 in Seifhennersdorf, Germany.
Sixth grade students attend their Middle School class on May 14, 2014 in Seifhennersdorf, Germany.
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

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Yesterday, California’s Board of Education commission began reviewing public comments in response to a controversial new proposal to overhaul the state’s math framework.

If implemented, the proposed framework would recommend that districts keep students in the same math classes through their sophomore year, instead of allowing some students to take advanced math courses in middle school. Proponents of the plan say it would make mathematics education more equitable and discourage the notion that some students are innately talented, and instead reward students for growth.  But opponents swiftly responded to the proposal, saying that the proposal would have the converse effect on students in the classroom. The proposal comes just after the University of California said it would no longer consider SAT and ACT scores in admissions— the result of a lawsuit from low income students of colors and students with disabilities.

Today on AirTalk, we are learning more about the California Department of Education’s proposal. What are your thought? Leave them below or give us a call at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Howard Blume, reporter covering education for The Los Angeles Times; he tweets @howardblume

Jo Boaler, professor of mathematics education at Stanford University and co-writer of the framework, she tweets @joboaler

Svetlana Jitomirskaya, distinguished professor of mathematics at UC Irvine