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Remote Employees Have Been Productive During The Pandemic, But Bosses Still Aren’t Sold




British Member of Parliament (MP) for Bath, Liberal Democrat Wera Hobhouse, works on a laptop during the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic from her home in Bath, south west England, on April 21, 2020.
British Member of Parliament (MP) for Bath, Liberal Democrat Wera Hobhouse, works on a laptop during the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic from her home in Bath, south west England, on April 21, 2020.
GEOFF CADDICK/AFP via Getty Images

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With COVID-19 vaccinations rolled out across the country, heads of companies that went remote during the pandemic are mulling back-to-the-office approaches for this summer.

And although office workers stayed productive throughout the pandemic, some high profile CEOs have declared remote work an “aberration” or not fit for “those who want to hustle.” The statements— from JP Morgan Chase & Co.’s Jamie Dimon and Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon, respectively— reveal a long-held bias against work from home that some workers thought the pandemic might quash. But not all workers want to stay fully remote. For younger employees hoping to make connections in their industry, virtual work cannot compare to the benefits of in-person. Many companies are in the early stages of fleshing out hybridized workplace models, which would promote flexibility in the workplace for both bosses and workers.

Why do some employers believe that remote work shows less commitment on behalf of the workers? And what would employees like to see from their companies? We want to hear from you! Give us a call at 866-893-5722.

Guest

Vanessa Fuhrmans, staff reporter at the Wall Street Journal and author of the recent piece “Bosses Still Aren’t Sure Remote Workers Have ‘Hustle’”; she tweets @vjfuhrmans