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How four immigrant brothers created an American film empire




Props and costumes are seen as Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood Adds Wonder Woman Exhibit to DC Universe: The Exhibit at Warner Bros. Tour Center on July 31, 2017 in Burbank, California.
Props and costumes are seen as Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood Adds Wonder Woman Exhibit to DC Universe: The Exhibit at Warner Bros. Tour Center on July 31, 2017 in Burbank, California.
Rich Fury/Getty Images for Warner Bros. St

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The studio behind the “Harry Potter” film franchise, Heath Ledger’s award-winning turn as the Joker and now feminist box office hit “Wonder Woman” didn’t always have a promising future.

Founded in the early twentieth century by four Jewish immigrants, Warner Bros. got off to a shaky start before making history with groundbreaking films like “The Jazz Singer” and “Casablanca.”

In his new book “Warner Bros: The Making of an American Movie Studio,” film critic David Thomson reveals how the Warners’ roots led them to create a film empire that reshaped ideas of what it meant to be Jewish, an immigrant and an American.

FilmWeek sits down with Thomson to hear about the rise of Warner Bros. through the four very different brothers behind the scenes, their most notable films, and the producers, directors and stars who made them.

Guest:

David Thomson, film critic, historian and author; his most recent book is “Warner Bros: The Making of an American Movie Studio



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