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Actors, how do you hone your chops?




Tony Curtis and Julie Adams (centre), famous alumni of the School for Stars in Hollywood, pay a visit to their old college and hold a class for the new generation of acting students in 1956. Behind Curtis stands a young Clint Eastwood.
Tony Curtis and Julie Adams (centre), famous alumni of the School for Stars in Hollywood, pay a visit to their old college and hold a class for the new generation of acting students in 1956. Behind Curtis stands a young Clint Eastwood.
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Independent acting schools and studios were once a main pipeline for talented student actors to enter the public forum, but as the film industry has evolved it has become less common for big name actors to have graduated from one of these programs.

Why have these studios’ popularity declined? And what will happen to theses acting schools and their instructors if they begin to shut down?

A recent article in the New York Times takes an in-depth look at how acting studios in New York City are struggling to compete with the rising cost of rent, increasingly prestigious acting programs at the college level, and the glut of actors who would prefer to spend what little time and money they have on audition classes rather than a studio. As one New York acting teacher put it, “My creative soul was crumbling” after she had to give up her studio space.

Though the article examines professional acting schools in New York, we can't help but wonder if a similar trend is occurring in Los Angeles. If you’re an actor who takes classes, where do you see the state of acting education? If you’re an acting teacher, how are you keeping enrollment up?

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Guest:

David Warshofsky, director of the MFA acting program at USC and associate professor of theatre practice at USC’s School of Dramatic Arts