Hosted by Sandra Tsing Loh, The Loh Down on Science is a fun way to get your daily dose of science plus a dash of humor in less than two minutes.
Hosted by Sandra Tsing Loh
Airs Weekdays 2:43 and 3:43 a.m.

Foul-Mouthed Facts




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Can’t control your potty mouth? Wait! There’s a silver lining!
 
This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science.  

Profanity is usually related to anger or frustration. And it’s traditionally frowned upon. But is there an UPSIDE?
 
To find out, David Stillwell from the University of Cambridge led an international team of researchers. The team examined profanity use in a series of questionnaires.
 
They asked nearly three hundred participants WHEN and WHY they curse. And what curse words they use most. The subjects were given a lie detector test to see if they were telling the truth. Instead of just saying what was socially acceptable.
 
What did the researchers find? People who reported using MORE curse words were more honest in their answers!
 
To follow up, they gathered data from seventy-five thousand Facebook users to see how people used profanity online. The result? People who curse more also use more words known to be associated with honesty. Like “I” and “me.”
 
If you ask your honest friend, “do these pants make me look fat?” prepare to face the truth - and hand them some soap!