Hosted by Sandra Tsing Loh, The Loh Down on Science is a fun way to get your daily dose of science plus a dash of humor in less than two minutes.
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Skin Fix

Harvard Gazette

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Can you put a bandage on your lungs?

This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science. 

Most of the time during surgery, our wounds are closed with stitches. In a pinch, you can mend a cut with super glue. But glue can also bug your skin and make infections worse! MEDICAL glues have been invented… but they are not stretchy enough for MOVING body parts. They also fail in WET situations. 

These pitfalls were on the minds of researchers from Harvard and Northeastern. They invented a type of glue to solves these problems. The main ingredient? A protein found in human skin! 

First, the gel is shot into the wound, where it sticks in place. Next, a UV light is used to solidify the paste. The researchers could change how STRETCHY and how STRONG the glue was with the light.

They tested their invention on rats and pigs. Results?! The glue seals everything from strong, thumping veins to fragile, expanding lung tissues! The researchers hope this will help in both surgery and emergency situations. 

But for LESS dire boo-boos? As always - a kiss from mommy!