Marketplace

Every weekday on Marketplace, Kai Ryssdal hosts a lively and unexpected exploration of the day’s business and economic news from Wall Street to your wallet.

Recent Episodes

08/16/2017: The day corporate America broke up with Trump

CEOs of some of the biggest companies in America have been saying for the past two days they simply had to stay on two White House councils. But after Trump's comments yesterday, more and more of them changed their minds and said a seat at the table wasn't worth it. Finally, President Trump announced via Twitter that he'd be disbanding the councils anyway, thank you very much. We'll talk about what changed the dynamic between the executive in D.C. and all the rest of them. Then: We told you yesterday about the time BMW took a chance on building a huge factory stateside. Today we'll look at what happened and talk to the families enjoying the spoils of globalization in our series Trade Off. Finally: We check in with cultural critic Wesley Morris about what people want to watch in these troubled times.

08/15/2017: Why would CEOs stick with Trump?

An infrastructure announcement turned into an off-the-rails press conference this afternoon as President Trump blasted the four (now five) CEOs who have left his manufacturing council. We'll correct the record on some of his criticisms and then zoom out to the bigger question: If you're a CEO tapped for one of these White House advisory roles, why do you stay? Then: Trump has nominated people to fill just 106 of 577 key Senate-confirmed jobs in his administration. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are both lacking permanent leadership. We'll try to figure out what's at stake for the scientific community without — or with — someone in charge. Plus: Your pumpkin pie is a lie, and we'll tell you why.

08/14/2017: When Trump does something — or doesn't — what's a CEO to do?

Seeing how we've started this program more than once with a tweet from the chief executive, we'll start today with a tweet from a chief executive. Pharmaceutical CEO Kenneth Frazier was a member of President Trump's Manufacturing Council until this morning. He announced his resignation on Twitter, citing Trump's belated response to the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. Trump responded with two searing tweets Monday about drug prices. Frazier and the dozens of other CEO advisers to the president are once again facing scrutiny over their response to a national issue with Trump at the center. Then: One small fishing town in Maine is trying something new to help the next generation gain valuable work skills: a new charter school focused on the idea of work-based learning, designed to put students into the community and expose them to different kinds of jobs in their state. Plus: James Patterson has a new book out, and the villain is very familiar...

08/11/2017: America the protectionist

Donald Trump won the presidency in part on the idea that the United States isn't getting its fair share of the global economic pie. The slogan "America First" more or less boils down to protectionism. Now, the Trumpian approach to global trade might feel like a departure from recent history. But the American industrial economy has its roots in protectionism, all the way back to Alexander Hamilton. We'll talk about it in the second installment of our series "Trade Off." Plus, the latest on SoundCloud's financial troubles, and we try to fit a wild week of news into five minutes of live radio. 

08/10/2017: Markets go down. Go figure.

All three major stock indices fell today, and not a little bit either. And guess what: That's what's supposed to happen. We'll talk about it when we do the numbers. Then: The White House touted a huge deal between Wisconsin an Foxconn: 13,000 jobs in exchange for $3 billion in tax breaks. The state won't break even for more than 25 years, but these deals are becoming more and more common. Plus: Most undocumented immigrants who are deported are Latino men with jobs. That has a ripple effect on housing.

08/09/2017: Stop worrying and love the bond market

The headlines about fire and fury and escalation and threats and all that has happened the past 24 hours are alarming. No doubt about it. Without discounting the reality of what's going on, allow us to cut through the fear a little bit. Nothing in this economy reacts as viscerally to the news as the markets to. The bond market, in particular, is a refuge in times of uncertainty. And it's telling us to take a deep breath. We'll explain. Then: For the first time in 60 years, the U.S. is set to become a net exporter of natural gas. No we need to get the infrastructure up to speed. Plus: Go ahead, cut the cord, see if cable companies care.