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Why we get sick—debating the genetic vs. environmental causes of diseases




The Bioscience Resource Project has come out with an analysis stating that genetic research has failed to show major causation betwen genes and disease—and that therefore, environmental causes are more significant.
The Bioscience Resource Project has come out with an analysis stating that genetic research has failed to show major causation betwen genes and disease—and that therefore, environmental causes are more significant.
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A lively debate is shaping up between environmentalists and geneticists. Environmentalists, pointing to an important new study, say that deviations from the genetic norm are too small to matter in determining, for example, whether or not you will be diabetic. If true, this must make environmental causes, like what you eat, proportionally much more important. Genetic medicine begs--loudly!--to differ. We hear from both sides.

Guests:

Jonathan Latham, Ph.D., Executive Director, Bioscience Resource Project

Stanley Nelson, M.D., Professor of Human Genetics and Psychiatry, Director of the UCLA DNA Microarray Facility, and Co-Director of the Center for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy