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UCLA study says a woman's facial features can hint at her political slant




Supporters cheer for U.S. President Barack Obama as he addresses a campaign event at the Palm Beach County Convention Center September 9, 2012 in West Palm Beach, Florida. Working with the momentum from this week's Democratic National Convention, Obama is on a two-day campaign swing from one side of Florida to the other on the politically important I-4 corridor.
Supporters cheer for U.S. President Barack Obama as he addresses a campaign event at the Palm Beach County Convention Center September 9, 2012 in West Palm Beach, Florida. Working with the momentum from this week's Democratic National Convention, Obama is on a two-day campaign swing from one side of Florida to the other on the politically important I-4 corridor.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Most people will, of course, be paying attention to the substance of the upcoming debates, but there are a few out there who might also be looking for style.

Appearance can matter — just think of the famous televised debates between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon. Looks also might help voters determine if a candidate is a Republican or a Democrat.

Especially when it comes to women, according to a new study by researchers at UCLA. The study found that women who have traditionally feminine features tend to be Republicans; The more feminine the face, the more conservative the politics.

Women with less feminine features lean more to the left.

Guest:

Kerri Johnson, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Communications at UCLA and author of the study