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California school districts vary on definition of 'willful defiance'




File: A student on his way to school walks past a Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) school, in Los Angeles, California on Feb. 13, 2009.
File: A student on his way to school walks past a Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) school, in Los Angeles, California on Feb. 13, 2009.
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

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Students throughout California are heading back to school this week, and depending on where they live, they run the risk of suspension for things like doodling, or falling asleep in class.

Some schools deem such behavior as "willful defiance," whereas other schools only consider things like hitting other students as willful defiance. A new report from EdSource finds a wide disparity in how often "willful defiance" is used to suspend students.

For more on this, we spoke with EdSource reporter Susan Frey who began by explaining how schools define the term.