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Scientists race to save the tiny Devil's Hole Pupfish




Exterior of Devil's Hole in Death Valley National Park. Inside this cavern is the only known habitat of the Devil's Hole Pupfish.
Exterior of Devil's Hole in Death Valley National Park. Inside this cavern is the only known habitat of the Devil's Hole Pupfish.
Exterior of Devil's Hole in Death Valley National Park. Inside this cavern is the only known habitat of the Devil's Hole Pupfish.
A Devil's Hole pupfish swims in an aquarium at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation facility in Amargosa Valley, Nevada. The fish in the aquarium were hatched from eggs collected at the species' only know habitat - an isolated limestone depression in the Mojave Desert.
Gina Ferazzi


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The tiny, inch-long Devil's Hole pupfish has existed for millions of years in Devil's Hole, a natural water filled cavern located within Death Valley. But they've been endangered since the '60s and their situation has gotten even more dire due to climate change.

Recently, wildlife experts have something to cheer about, raising a group of them in captivity, a move some are saying is the key to saving the species.

Darrick Weissenfluh, a fish biologist with the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility, joins the show to talk about saving the pupfish.