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Remembering Maya Angelou's impact on young, aspiring writers




Poet Dr. Maya Angelou celebrates her 82nd birthday with friends and family at her home on May 20, 2010 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
Poet Dr. Maya Angelou celebrates her 82nd birthday with friends and family at her home on May 20, 2010 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Today we say goodbye to the extraordinary poet and writer Maya Angelou. The legendary poet died this morning in her home in Winston Salem North Carolina. She was 86 years old.

RELATED: Poet Maya Angelou, 86, has died

Her memoir, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," was one of the first autobiographies by a modern black woman to enjoy success among mainstream audiences.

Here she is reading her poem "On the Pulse of Morning," at the inauguration of Bill Clinton:

A Rock, A River, A Tree
Hosts to species long since departed,Marked the mastodon
The dinosaur, who left dried tokens
Of their sojourn here
On our planet floor,
Any broad alarm of their hastening doom
Is lost in the gloom of dust and ages.
But today, the Rock cries out to us, clearly, forcefully,
Come, you may stand upon my
Back and face your distant destiny,
But seek no haven in my shadow,
I will give you no hiding place down here. 

To talk about how she affected other young writers, we're joined now by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and screenwriter Suzan-Lori Parks.