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World Cup 2014: Protests, metro strike hit Sao Paulo as first game near




Commuters wait for transportation during a tangled afternoon commute on June 9, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Metro workers have entered their fifth day of a strike in the city leaving most metro stations closed and causing major traffic jams. The opening match for the 2014 World Cup is June 12 when Brazil takes on Croatia.
Commuters wait for transportation during a tangled afternoon commute on June 9, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Metro workers have entered their fifth day of a strike in the city leaving most metro stations closed and causing major traffic jams. The opening match for the 2014 World Cup is June 12 when Brazil takes on Croatia.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

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The World Cup begins tomorrow, but questions over cost overruns and preparation are still issues. Nowhere is that more apparent than in Sao Paulo, host to tomorrow's opening game.

There, traffic has become a major factor, because metro workers have threatened to resume a strike that sent the streets into chaos just days ago. But Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff dismissed concerns, saying in a national address that the country is ready.

"There are people who claim the resources for World Cup should have been directed to health care and education. I hear and respect their opinion but I don't agree with them. It's a false dilemma," said Rousseff Tuesday.

Journalist Mauricio Savarese describes "tension in the air" in Sao Paulo.

"Tomorrow is going to be a very interesting game of wait and see," he tells Take Two. That's when metro workers are scheduled to resume talks with officials.

It's also when host-favorites Brazil takes on Croatia and attempts a run at history: to raise the trophy for the first time on home soil.