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Maker Faire: What can 'maker culture' do for the US economy?




U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Lindsay Lawlor of San Diego, California, the builder of a robotic giraffe at the White House Maker Faire projects on the South Lawn June 18, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Faire is a series of projects by students,  entrepreneurs and regular citizens using new technologies and tools to launch new businesses and learning new skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Lindsay Lawlor of San Diego, California, the builder of a robotic giraffe at the White House Maker Faire projects on the South Lawn June 18, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Faire is a series of projects by students, entrepreneurs and regular citizens using new technologies and tools to launch new businesses and learning new skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
Pool/Getty Images
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Lindsay Lawlor of San Diego, California, the builder of a robotic giraffe at the White House Maker Faire projects on the South Lawn June 18, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Faire is a series of projects by students,  entrepreneurs and regular citizens using new technologies and tools to launch new businesses and learning new skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
An exhibit on display at Maker Faire New York 2012
Sparkfun Electronics/Flickr/Creative Commons


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Today, the White House hosts its first ever Maker Faire. These events, started in the Bay Area eight years ago, are what you get when you mix science fairs with county fairs.

RELATED: White House Maker Faire: San Diego man presents electric giraffe

Makers — made up of engineers, tinkers, artists, hobbyists, and more — gather to show off their latest inventions, designs, and fun-filled devices. By hosting this event, the White House hopes to jump start innovation and promote manufacturing in the creative fields.  

Mark Allen, founder and executive director of the L.A. non-profit Machine Project, gives Take Two a look into "maker culture," and what bringing it to mainstream attention could do for economy.