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President Obama plans to sidestep Congress on Immigration




US Presidential Barack Obama speaks on immigration reform beside US Vice President Joe Biden (R) in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 30, 2014 in Washington, DC.
US Presidential Barack Obama speaks on immigration reform beside US Vice President Joe Biden (R) in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 30, 2014 in Washington, DC.
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

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President Obama announced he's taking charge in the immigration debate with bold steps on reform through executive order.

"I'm beginning a new effort to fix as much of our immigration system as I can on my own," he said from the Rose Garden, "Without Congress."

Immigration reform continues to stagnate in Congress while 11 million undocumented immigrants are waiting for some kind of action. With lawmakers out this week for the July 4th holiday, Obama's move puts pressure on Congress to come back either with a plan for reform or a challenge directly to him on the issue.

To look at what kind of orders the President could issue, and the limits to those powers, UCLA law professor Hiroshi Motomura joins Take Two. He's also the author of the new book, "Immigration Outside the Law," and was influential the last time the President issued an order that affected immigration: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.