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Why are so many Central American children migrating to the US?




Antonio (back to the camera), a teenager deported from the United States, is interviewed at the attention module for repatriated migrant children on June 9, 2014 in Tijuana, Mexico. According to the US border patrol, between last October 1 and May 31, 47.017 minors who entered the country illegally without the company of an adult were identified, almost doubling the number registered in 2013.
Antonio (back to the camera), a teenager deported from the United States, is interviewed at the attention module for repatriated migrant children on June 9, 2014 in Tijuana, Mexico. According to the US border patrol, between last October 1 and May 31, 47.017 minors who entered the country illegally without the company of an adult were identified, almost doubling the number registered in 2013.
OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images

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This week, protesters blocked several buses transporting mostly women and children to a processing center in Murrieta.

That's part of a federal plan to bring migrants to sites in the region, including in El Centro to help with the overflow from South Texas. Officials say more than 50,000 children have been detained this year for making the crossing.

RELATED: For desperate parents of Central American child migrants, a false rumor and false hope

There are a few reasons why there's been a recent influx of young people coming to the U.S. For one, dire conditions in Central America is the most recognized reason, but there are also rumors that children coming to the U.S. alone will  have an easier time staying here. 

For more on why these kids are coming to the United States, we're joined by Southern California Public Radio's Leslie Berestein Rojas.