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In Honduras, after a perilous journey, deported youth return to harsh conditions




Armed army soldiers await to embark on city buses in Tegucigalpa, on March 11, 2014, during a deployment of troops in the urban transport in an attempt to stop violence against commuters and drivers from criminal gangs.
Armed army soldiers await to embark on city buses in Tegucigalpa, on March 11, 2014, during a deployment of troops in the urban transport in an attempt to stop violence against commuters and drivers from criminal gangs.
ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images

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This week, President Obama is expected to ask congress for an additional $2 billion in funds to respond to the sharp rise in migrant children from Central America.  

The request is part of a federal response to the rise in unaccompanied minors crossing the US southern border. Some 50,000 children have been apprehended since last October.

Part of that response is ask to streamline deportations of youth, according to Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson.  

"Our message to those who come here illegally: our border is not open to illegal migration and we are taking a number of steps to address it, including turning people around faster," said Johnson on NBC's Meet the Press on Sunday. "We've already dramatically reduced the turn around time, the deportation time for adults. We're asking this week for supplemental from congress to build on additional capacity and we're cracking down on the smuggling organization."

But what happens to youth when they are deported back to their home countries? And what are the conditions on the ground driving this surge?  

For more, we’re joined by Aaron Nelsen, reporter for the San Antonio Express News. We reach him in Honduras, where many of the recent migrants are from.  

You can read Nelsen's stories from Honduras here.



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