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A look at what's pushing Central American children to the US




Two female detainees sleep in a holding cell, as the children are separated by age group and gender, as hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center on June 18, 2014, in Nogales, Arizona.  Brownsville, Texas, and Nogales, have been central to processing the more than 47,000 unaccompanied children who have entered the country illegally since Oct. 1.
Two female detainees sleep in a holding cell, as the children are separated by age group and gender, as hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center on June 18, 2014, in Nogales, Arizona. Brownsville, Texas, and Nogales, have been central to processing the more than 47,000 unaccompanied children who have entered the country illegally since Oct. 1.
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As the influx of immigrants across the U.S.-Mexico border continues, Federal authorities are struggling to deal with many unaccompanied children arriving on American soil.

Earlier this week President Obama requested $3.7 billion dollars from Congress to deal with the crisis. Most of the these kids are coming from Central America. For more, we reached Carlos Dada, founder and editor of the online publication El Faro in El Salvador.