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Why are there multiple investigations into the Ferguson shooting of Michael Brown?




Standing in the parking lot of a gas station which was burned during rioting, Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson announces the name of the Ferguson police officer responsible for the August 9, shooting death of teenager Michael Brown on August 15, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. The officer was identified as Darren Wilson, a six year veteran of the police department. Brown's killing sparked several days of violent protests in the city.
Standing in the parking lot of a gas station which was burned during rioting, Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson announces the name of the Ferguson police officer responsible for the August 9, shooting death of teenager Michael Brown on August 15, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. The officer was identified as Darren Wilson, a six year veteran of the police department. Brown's killing sparked several days of violent protests in the city.
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The attorney for the family of Michael Brown, the Ferguson, Missouri teen killed by a white police officer on Aug. 9, said today that an independent autopsy showed he was shot multiple times.

The results come from just one of three separate autopsies that are taking place as part of investigations into the incident, which has sparked ongoing protests outside St. Louis and a strong debate nationwide over the use of deadly force.

The U.S. Justice Department says it will conduct its own autopsy as part of a federal probe into Brown's death. 

So when does the federal government step into local cases like these?

S. David Mitchell, associate professor of law at the University of Missouri Law School, says that the feds often step in when it appears the public has lost faith in local authorities to conduct an investigation properly and that, sometimes, multiple investigations can be at odds.