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How will schools handle the influx of unaccompanied minors?




A Salvadorian family waits at the Greyhound bus station for their trip to Houston on July 25, 2014 in McAllen, Texas. They said they had spent 6 days at a U.S. Border Patrol detention center before being released. Federal agencies have been overwhelmed by tens of thousands of immigrant families and unaccompanied minors from Central America crossing illegally into the United States. Many are being processed and released within days, with a requirement to enter immigration court proceedings at a later date. Texas' Rio Grande Valley has become the epicenter of the latest immigrant crisis, as more Central Americans have crossed illegally from Mexico into that sector than any other stretch of America's 1,933 mile border with Mexico.
A Salvadorian family waits at the Greyhound bus station for their trip to Houston on July 25, 2014 in McAllen, Texas. They said they had spent 6 days at a U.S. Border Patrol detention center before being released. Federal agencies have been overwhelmed by tens of thousands of immigrant families and unaccompanied minors from Central America crossing illegally into the United States. Many are being processed and released within days, with a requirement to enter immigration court proceedings at a later date. Texas' Rio Grande Valley has become the epicenter of the latest immigrant crisis, as more Central Americans have crossed illegally from Mexico into that sector than any other stretch of America's 1,933 mile border with Mexico.
John Moore/Getty Images

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With the school year in full swing, there still remains the question of how schools will handle the influx of unaccompanied minors who immigrated to the U.S. recently. Under federal law, all children are entitled to a free public education no matter their immigration status. 

Joining Take Two to talk more about how schools are handling this is National Education Association president Lily Eskelsen Garcia.