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President Obama's role in Michael Brown case and Ferguson violence




A law enforcement officer watches on during a protest on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri on August 18, 2014. Police fired tear gas in another night of unrest in a Missouri town where a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, just hours after President Barack Obama called for calm.
A law enforcement officer watches on during a protest on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri on August 18, 2014. Police fired tear gas in another night of unrest in a Missouri town where a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, just hours after President Barack Obama called for calm.
MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images

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Tensions in Ferguson, Missouri remain high as protesters continue to clash with police officers. On Monday President Obama addressed the unrest with the following statements: 

"Well, I understand the passions and the anger that arise over the death of Michael Brown. Giving into that anger by looting or carrying guns and even attacking the police only deserves to raise tensions and stir chaos. It undermines, rather than advancing justice. Let me also be clear that our Constitutional rights to speak freely, to assemble and to report in the press must be vigilantly safeguarded, especially in moments like these. There's no excuse for excessive force by police or any action that denies people the right to protest peacefully"

Slate's Jamelle Bouie, frequent guest on Take Two, initially believed it was best that the President refrain from addressing the events in Ferguson and the details in the Michael Brown case. He later shared a Tweet saying that Obama was needed in Ferguson. He joins the show to explain what changed his mind and what the President's actions might signal.