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Environment & Science

Scientists switch bad memories with good ones in mice




CHONGQING, CHINA - FEBRUARY 16: (CHINA OUT) Female white rats stand in a basin at an animal laboratory of a medical school on February 16, 2008 in Chongqing Municipality, China. Over 100,000 rats and mice are used in experiments every year for pharmaceutical research in the lab, where the temperature is kept at 24 degrees centigrade. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)
CHONGQING, CHINA - FEBRUARY 16: (CHINA OUT) Female white rats stand in a basin at an animal laboratory of a medical school on February 16, 2008 in Chongqing Municipality, China. Over 100,000 rats and mice are used in experiments every year for pharmaceutical research in the lab, where the temperature is kept at 24 degrees centigrade. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)
China Photos/Getty Images

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Most memories have some kind of emotion attached to them. For example, you might be overcome with negative feelings when you think about the time you went on a bad date, or you might feel happy when you think about the time you went camping with your friends.

What if you could replace the memory of the bad date into a good one? That's just what neuroscientists at MIT have been doing with mice, according to a recent study. Roger Redondo, lead author of the research, says they have found a way to switch bad memories with good ones in mice.