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Bones reveal new dinosaur species




In this unrelated photo, a Tarbosaurus from Mongolia (L) is seen next to the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex, named Sue, at the Dinosaur Expo in 2005.
In this unrelated photo, a Tarbosaurus from Mongolia (L) is seen next to the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex, named Sue, at the Dinosaur Expo in 2005.
Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images

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An new dinosaur species, what may be one of the largest ever discovered, was officially named Thursday in a paper published by the journal Scientific Reports. It's called Dreadnoughtus schrani. 

About 70 percent of the dinosaur's skeleton could be reconstructed with bones found in Southern Argentina in 2005.

"The prefix 'dread' might make it sound like a terrifying predator, but this was more of a gentle giant," says National Geographic writer Brian Switek. "Overall, this animal would have been about 86 feet long and 60 tons, so this is a pretty heft dinosaur."

Switek said Dreadnoughtus schrani is believed to have lived at the very end of the dinosaur reign and is one of the last great giants.