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Reduction on border crossings from Central America to Mexico




A young boy looks out of a car window upon arriving to San Pedro Sula, 240 kms north of Tegucigalpa, on July 2, 2014, after being deported from the US. Thousands of unaccompanied children, most of them from Central America, have trekked to the United States in recent months and now face deportation in what the United States has called a humanitarian crisis.
A young boy looks out of a car window upon arriving to San Pedro Sula, 240 kms north of Tegucigalpa, on July 2, 2014, after being deported from the US. Thousands of unaccompanied children, most of them from Central America, have trekked to the United States in recent months and now face deportation in what the United States has called a humanitarian crisis.
ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images

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The number of families and unaccompanied minors crossing the US border has dropped in recent months, down from a record high earlier this summer. 

Part of that could be due to action the Mexican government has taken to stem migration from Central America--action that also raises questions about long term solutions.  

Carrie Kahn, NPR correspondent in Mexico City, shares more.