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What is the legal basis for a climate change deal?




Demonstrators make their way down Sixth Avenue in New York during the People's Climate March on Sunday.
Demonstrators make their way down Sixth Avenue in New York during the People's Climate March on Sunday.
Jason DeCrow/AP

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At the UN climate summit this week in New York, there's been no shortage of bold pledges. India doubling its wind and solar output by 2020. A 30-year-plan to protect forests in Myanmar. And President Obama acknowledging the US role as one of the top producers of CO2 emissions, along with China, in the world.
 
"We recognize our role in creating this problem. We embrace our responsibility to combat it," said Obama Tuesday. "We will do our part and we will help developing nations do theirs. But we can only succeed in combatting climate change if we are joined in this effort by every nation, developed and developing alike. Nobody gets a pass.”

But what role does the law play in all this? How do we ensure that all nations agree to the abide by rules intended to protect the planet?

For a look at the details, Cara Horowitz, co-executive director of the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the UCLA School of Law, joins Take Two.

 



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