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Gay marriage supporters happy and disappointed by the Supreme Court




Activists on the steps of the Supreme Court in 2013 when they heard arguments over the Defense of Marriage Act, which denies federal benefits to gay couples legally married under the laws of their state.
Activists on the steps of the Supreme Court in 2013 when they heard arguments over the Defense of Marriage Act, which denies federal benefits to gay couples legally married under the laws of their state.
Joshua Roberts/Reuters/Landov

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The Supreme Court has declined to hear appeals from five states seeking to ban same-sex marriage.

It's cleared the way for vows in those states -- Virginia, Oklahoma, Utah, Wisconsin and Indiana.

But it's a bittersweet victory for gay marriage activists.

Many had hoped the high court would take on at least one of those cases to directly address the question of whether same-sex marriage is legal throughout the whole nation.

As it stands, this latest move continues to create a patchwork of states where gay marriage is legal in some, not in others, and sometimes recognized elsewhere.

Evan Wolfson, president of the group Freedom to Marry, says the Supreme Court should finish the job.