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Same-sex weddings put on hold in Idaho and Nevada




SLAT LAKE CITY, UT - JANUARY 28: Supporters hold a pro-gay marriage rally outside the Utah State Capitol on January 28, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Several weeks ago a federal judge ruled unconstitutional a voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage in the state of Utah. The ruling has since been stayed and is working it's way through the legal system. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
SLAT LAKE CITY, UT - JANUARY 28: Supporters hold a pro-gay marriage rally outside the Utah State Capitol on January 28, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Several weeks ago a federal judge ruled unconstitutional a voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage in the state of Utah. The ruling has since been stayed and is working it's way through the legal system. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
George Frey/Getty Images

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You know that trope of a couple at the wedding alter and the audience is asked, "Does anyone here know why these two should not be married?"

Well, someone said, "Yes!" and Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy was the one shouting.

When the high court earlier this week refused to hear cases involving same-sex marriage bans in five states, it cleared the way for gay couples to say, "I do."

But Justice Kennedy put a hold on gay weddings in Idaho and Nevada that were supposed to have started Wednesday.

To explain why Kennedy temporarily stopped them, Adam Romero, professor of law at UCLA's Williams Institute, weighs in.