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Gun ranges pose lead risks to children and workers, report finds




Domenic Lether teaches his girlfriend Ngozi Ogbeni how to shoot a Smith & Wesson .357 magnum revolver at a target range at the Los Angeles Gun Club on December 7, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Recently, kids and teenagers across the country have exposed themselves to the poisonous metals by participating in gun clubs.
Domenic Lether teaches his girlfriend Ngozi Ogbeni how to shoot a Smith & Wesson .357 magnum revolver at a target range at the Los Angeles Gun Club on December 7, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Recently, kids and teenagers across the country have exposed themselves to the poisonous metals by participating in gun clubs.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Lead poisoning can be dangerous to anyone. But it's especially harmful to children.

Their smaller, growing bodies make them more susceptible to absorbing and retaining lead.

Recently, kids and teenagers across the country have exposed themselves to the poisonous metals by participating in gun clubs.
 
The Seattle Times looked into the issue after unsafe levels of lead were found in blood tests of 20 young people shooting at a gun club in Vancouver, Washington.

As one of the teenagers recalled, "We would get lead on our hands and eat finger food."

The investigation also found that employees of the gun ranges were at risk and little was being done to monitor or ensure safety.

Read the series, Loaded with Lead from the Seattle Times.