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Community group monitors border patrol amidst harassment claims




A U.S. Border Patrol agent stands at the U.S.-Mexico border fence on February 26, 2013 in Nogales, Arizona. Various federal agencies are tasked with securing the border from drug smugglers and illegal immigration in the Tucson sector of Arizona. A community group took matters into its own hands after the feds refused to share data about who is being stopped and detained at its interior checkpoint in Arivaca, about 25 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border.
A U.S. Border Patrol agent stands at the U.S.-Mexico border fence on February 26, 2013 in Nogales, Arizona. Various federal agencies are tasked with securing the border from drug smugglers and illegal immigration in the Tucson sector of Arizona. A community group took matters into its own hands after the feds refused to share data about who is being stopped and detained at its interior checkpoint in Arivaca, about 25 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border.
John Moore/Getty Images

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Some residents in the border town of Arivaca, Arizona have claimed that a local Border Patrol checkpoint does not make the community safer, but subjects people--especially Latinos--to unnecessary harassment.

Activists have asked the federal agency to turn over data about who is being stopped and detained at its interior checkpoint in Arivaca, about 25 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border.

So far the feds have refused to share that data.

A community group began monitoring the checkpoint themselves this year and just released their findings.

Reporter Kate Sheehy has the story for Fronteras Desk