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Three Colorado teenage girls among many females lured online by Islamic militant group




An image grab taken from an AFPTV video on September 16, 2014 shows a jihadist from the Islamic State (IS) group standing on the rubble of houses after a Syrian warplane was reportedly shot down by IS militants over the Syrian town of Raqa. The plane crashed into a house in the Euphrates Valley city, the sole provincial capital entirely out of Syrian government control, causing deaths and injuries on the ground.
An image grab taken from an AFPTV video on September 16, 2014 shows a jihadist from the Islamic State (IS) group standing on the rubble of houses after a Syrian warplane was reportedly shot down by IS militants over the Syrian town of Raqa. The plane crashed into a house in the Euphrates Valley city, the sole provincial capital entirely out of Syrian government control, causing deaths and injuries on the ground.
-/AFP/Getty Images

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Reports have shared for months how women are being recruited online by the group that calls itself the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. Women are called on to cook, clean and, essentially be wives to the men in the militant group.

This was capped by the report this week of three young Colorado girls who apparently left home to join the group.

Kim Ghattas, is a BBC correspondent and the author of "The Secretary: A Journey with Hillary Clinton from Beirut to the Heart of American Power." She says the young women ISIS is preying on online are vulnerable, often second-generation immigrants who don't know the harsh realities that their parents faced in their home countries in the Middle East before immigrating. Moreover, according to Ghattas, ISIS is presenting very idealized versions of what life will be like for these women once they join the group.