News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

How widespread is hazing in American culture?




Family members of late Armando Villa, from left: Joshua Castaneda, his mother Martha Castaneda, and aunt, Maria Castaneda react as California State University, Northridge, CSUN president Dr. Dianne Harrison, not seen, reads a statement regarding Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity activities that lead to the death of CSUN student Armando Villa, during a news conference at the CSUN campus in Northridge, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Villa died during a fraternity-sponsored hike in the Angeles National Forest.
Family members of late Armando Villa, from left: Joshua Castaneda, his mother Martha Castaneda, and aunt, Maria Castaneda react as California State University, Northridge, CSUN president Dr. Dianne Harrison, not seen, reads a statement regarding Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity activities that lead to the death of CSUN student Armando Villa, during a news conference at the CSUN campus in Northridge, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Villa died during a fraternity-sponsored hike in the Angeles National Forest.
Damian Dovarganes/AP

Listen to story

08:59
Download this story 4MB

California State University Northridge has banned all of its 54 fraternities and sororities from recruitment and pledging activities for new members.

The move comes after the campus launched an investigation into the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity regarding a possible hazing incident.

CSUN has been very concerned about the practice of hazing lately.

Earlier this year, a 19-year-old student died during a hike with another fraternity. School administrators determined it was a hazing-related death.

For more on the current state of hazing and the role it plays at universities and other parts of society, documentary filmmaker Byron Hurt joins Take Two.

His current project is called, Hazing: How Badly do you Want In?