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Climate change poses 'immediate risks' to national security, US military says




FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2010, file photo, a slurry bomber drops fire retardant on a burning ridge as the sun sets behind it as a wildfire burns west of Loveland, Colo. Global warming is rapidly turning America into a stormy and dangerous place, with rising seas and disasters upending lives from flood-stricken Florida to the wildfire-ravaged West, according to a new U.S. federal scientific report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Climate change's assorted harms
FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2010, file photo, a slurry bomber drops fire retardant on a burning ridge as the sun sets behind it as a wildfire burns west of Loveland, Colo. Global warming is rapidly turning America into a stormy and dangerous place, with rising seas and disasters upending lives from flood-stricken Florida to the wildfire-ravaged West, according to a new U.S. federal scientific report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Climate change's assorted harms "are expected to become increasingly disruptive across the nation throughout this century and beyond," the National Climate Assessment concluded. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)
Ed Andrieski/AP

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Scientists warned climate change could lead to "irreversible impacts" unless drastic action is taken on a global scale. Changes could include rising oceans and more extreme weather. And it's not just scientists or environmentalists sounding the alarm these days.

It's also the military.

Last month the Department of Defense released what it called a "road map" to respond to climate change. Joining Take Two for more is Francesco Femia. He's founding director of The Center for Climate and Security, a nonprofit policy institute based in Washington, DC.

You can access the reports mentioned in this interview below:

The US Department of Defense's Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap

The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Synthesis Report