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1 year after devastating typhoon, Southern California Filipinos aid in recovery




Aquilina Soriano, left, executive director of the Pilipino Workers Center, and Leah Tejada, right, whose family in the Philippines is still feeling the effects from Typhoon Haiyan one year ago.
Aquilina Soriano, left, executive director of the Pilipino Workers Center, and Leah Tejada, right, whose family in the Philippines is still feeling the effects from Typhoon Haiyan one year ago.
Dorian Merina
Aquilina Soriano, left, executive director of the Pilipino Workers Center, and Leah Tejada, right, whose family in the Philippines is still feeling the effects from Typhoon Haiyan one year ago.
Leah Tejada's family in the Philippines is still feeling the effects from Typhoon Haiyan one year ago.
Dorian Merina


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A year ago this week, Typhoon Haiyan blasted through the Philippines with winds close to 200 miles per hour.

Scientists called it the strongest typhoon to ever make landfall. It destroyed almost everything in its path.

More than 6,000 people died and millions more were injured or left homeless.

The effect of Haiyan, also known as Yolanda in the Philippines, was also felt in Filipino communities around the world, including here in Southern California.

In this segment, we speak with one local organization which has been providing much-needed relief in the slow recovery efforts.

We also hear about local families directly affected by the typhoon and how they've been coping.

Guests:

Aquilina Soriano is the executive director of the Pilipino Workers Center in LA, one of the groups leading the response.

Leah Tejada is a caregiver based in Los Angeles. Her family lives in the area hit by the storm.