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California drought leads to more smog, water theft




LAKEHEAD, CA - AUGUST 31:  Dry cracked earth is visible on the banks of Shasta Lake at Bailey Cove August 31, 2014 in Lakehead, California.  As the severe drought in California continues for a third straight year, water levels in the State's lakes and reservoirs is reaching historic lows. Shasta Lake is currently near 30 percent of its total capacity, the lowest it has been since 1977.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LAKEHEAD, CA - AUGUST 31: Dry cracked earth is visible on the banks of Shasta Lake at Bailey Cove August 31, 2014 in Lakehead, California. As the severe drought in California continues for a third straight year, water levels in the State's lakes and reservoirs is reaching historic lows. Shasta Lake is currently near 30 percent of its total capacity, the lowest it has been since 1977. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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We may not be able to perfectly predict earthquakes, but we can expect more smog here in California.

That's thanks to the ongoing drought.

Scientists say prolonged dry spells have brought more temperature inversions, with the warmer air trapping cooler air below and concentrating pollution.

The ongoing drought has also lead to an uptick in water theft.

Reporter Denis Cuff, who writes about environmental issues for the Contra Costa Times, shares more.