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Education

Amid student protests, UC Regents vote for big tuition hikes




Yvette Felarca, an alumni of the University of California Berkeley and member of the group By Any Means Necessary, claps and yells as a vote is taken to raise tuition during a meeting of the University of California Board of Regents Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, in San Francisco. A committee of the Regents approved UC President Janet Napolitano's proposal to raise tuition as much as 5 percent annually. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Yvette Felarca, an alumni of the University of California Berkeley and member of the group By Any Means Necessary, claps and yells as a vote is taken to raise tuition during a meeting of the University of California Board of Regents Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, in San Francisco. A committee of the Regents approved UC President Janet Napolitano's proposal to raise tuition as much as 5 percent annually. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Eric Risberg/AP

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University of California Regents voted Thursday to increase tuition by as much as 28 percent over the next five years. 

The Regents say if they don't start getting more money from the state, they might start turning away more Californians and increasing the number of out-of-state students who pay higher tuition. 

Not long ago, the UC system was seen as a shining example of how to offer an affordable world-class college education to California residents. Now many are questioning that reputation. 

Louis Freedberg is the Executive Director of EdSource, a non-profit that covers education issues. He joins Take Two to talk about the tuition increases and the future of California's university system.

One of the big problems the UC system faces is an uncertain state budget that fluctuates every year -- a long-term, systemic issue that is not being adequately addressed. And one of Freedberg's concerns is what's going to happen in five years.

"Is this a proposal that's going to continue in perpetuity," he asked. "Parents who now have kids who are in grade school, what kind of tuition costs are they going to be facing?"