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Missing students case draws attention to gaps in Mexican justice system




Demonstrators hold a riot police during clashes following a protest against the suspected massacre of 43 missing students, near the airport in Acapulco, in the Mexican state of Guerrero State, on November 10, 2014.
Demonstrators hold a riot police during clashes following a protest against the suspected massacre of 43 missing students, near the airport in Acapulco, in the Mexican state of Guerrero State, on November 10, 2014.
PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images

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There have been several arrests of those thought to be connected to the disappearances of the missing students in Iguala, Mexico.

But that hasn't quelled much of the outrage.

And part of that may have to do with Mexico's spotty record on justice in cases like this.

"What's interesting about the Iguala case is that we see the coordination of the state forces with organized crime," said Octavio Rodriguez, coordinator of the Justice In Mexico Program at the University of San Diego. "And I think that's why this case has brought a lot of attention and a lot of frustration from the Mexican people."