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California could benefit from US-Cuba thaw




WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 17:  U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the nation about normalizing diplomatic relations the Cuba in the Cabinet Room of the White House on December 17, 2014 in Washington, DC. Obama announced plans to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba, over 50 years after they were severed in January 1961. In a prisoner exchange, U.S. contractor Alan Gross was freed after being held in Cuba since 2009 and sent to Cuba three Cuban spies who had imprisoned in the U.S. since 2001.  (Photo by Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 17: U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the nation about normalizing diplomatic relations the Cuba in the Cabinet Room of the White House on December 17, 2014 in Washington, DC. Obama announced plans to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba, over 50 years after they were severed in January 1961. In a prisoner exchange, U.S. contractor Alan Gross was freed after being held in Cuba since 2009 and sent to Cuba three Cuban spies who had imprisoned in the U.S. since 2001. (Photo by Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)
Pool/Getty Images

Yesterday, President Obama's announced big changes intended to renew relations with Cuba. He says he intends to create more opportunities for both the American and Cuban people, and begin a new chapter among the nations of the Americas.

But these changes could have local implications here in California, too. Carla Marinucci recently wrote about this for the San Francisco Chronicle, and she joins the show to talk more about it