News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

Study finds bias against Latin Americans in legal immigration process




A U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Naturalization Ceremony on May 13, 2014. 125 individuals from more than 50 countries take the oath at the naturalization ceremony.
A U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Naturalization Ceremony on May 13, 2014. 125 individuals from more than 50 countries take the oath at the naturalization ceremony.
Department of Labor

Listen to story

06:43
Download this story 3MB

With immigration reform in the news, there's been a lot of focus on policies affecting undocumented workers. GOP leaders are looking to undo President Barack Obama's executive order that would defer deportations and allow work permits for millions of undocumented immigrants.

Some argue that the president's executive action would be unfair to immigrants who have come to the U.S. legally. But a new study by researchers at MIT and Brown University questions the fairness of the legal immigration process for those applying for employment-based green cards. 

The study, published in the American Sociological Review, finds evidence of bias against immigrants from Latin America in the green card approval process. Brown University sociology professor Ben Rissing co-authored the study and joins Take Two for more.