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Should you go a little easier on your co-worker who comes to work sick?




This 2009 photograph captured a sneeze in progress, revealing the plume of salivary droplets as they are expelled in a large cone-shaped array from this man’s open mouth, thereby, dramatically illustrating the reason one needs to cover his/her mouth when coughing, or sneezing, in order to protect others from germ exposure. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
This 2009 photograph captured a sneeze in progress, revealing the plume of salivary droplets as they are expelled in a large cone-shaped array from this man’s open mouth, thereby, dramatically illustrating the reason one needs to cover his/her mouth when coughing, or sneezing, in order to protect others from germ exposure. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
James Gathany

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If you work in an office, you know what time of year it is. It's when sounds of coughing and sneezing mix in with the usual office chatter. And maybe when you wish your sniffling, hacking co-workers would just stay home already.

The conventional wisdom goes that those people who still come in to work when they're sick are putting their healthy colleagues at risk. Or that they're not actually being very productive anyway, and would do better to stay home and rest up.

But writer Daniel Engber argues that you should "Quit Whining About Your Sick Colleague." Engber joins Take Two to talk about the research he's found to back up the claim.