News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

Deadly attack at Charlie Hebdo hits tight-knit community of political cartoonists




A person reads the latest issue of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on Jan. 7, 2015, after gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of the weekly in Paris, killing at least 11.
A person reads the latest issue of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on Jan. 7, 2015, after gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of the weekly in Paris, killing at least 11.
Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

07:36
Download this story 18MB

The killing in France of some of the country's most celebrated humorists and political cartoonists has sent a wave of shock and horror through the tight-knit global community of cartoonists - a group not known to shake easily.

French officials say one man sought in connection with the deadly shooting at the offices of a satirical magazine has surrendered. Two other suspects, a pair of brothers, remain at large.

Wednesday afternoon, they allegedly stormed into the offices of Charlie Hebdo and opened fire, killing 12 people.

People have rallied in France and across the world behind the magazine.

"We need to defend absolutely the freedom of speech," said Patrick Chappatte, editorial cartoonist for the International New York Times and currently a visiting scholar at USC. "Moderate people are able to be moderate and have free speech only because there are some people on the fringe."

https://twitter.com/chappatte/status/552901698629677056/photo/1​

Those provocateurs play a crucial role in society, said Chappatte, who added there is always a delicate balance between the protections of freedom and the need to maintain a respectful discourse.

Cartoonist Dan Carino contributed to this story.