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Cars are more networked, and more vulnerable to hacking




The interior of a Tesla car with displays for a web browser, Google Map view and a dashboard view that includes the odometer and a picture of the album that's being streamed from a cloud service.
The interior of a Tesla car with displays for a web browser, Google Map view and a dashboard view that includes the odometer and a picture of the album that's being streamed from a cloud service.
Flickr user Steve Jurvetson/Creative Commons

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We're all pretty familiar with car jackings, but car hackings?

Technology in cars is meant to make driving easier – from GPS devices to bluetooth sound systems – but hackers have found ways to break into those networks.

Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) is calling on carmakers to make their vehicles more secure.

Andy Greenberg, a senior writer for Wired magazine, saw up-close what happens when a car gets hacked and talks about how many new cars on the market are vulnerable.