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FAA releases new drone rules, and Amazon isn't happy




BONN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 09:  A quadcopter drone arrives with a small delivery at Deutsche Post headquarters on December 9, 2013 in Bonn, Germany. Deutsche Post is testing deliveries of medicine from a pharmacy in Bonn in an examination into the viability of using drones for deliveries of small packages over short distances. U.S. online retailer Amazon has also started its intention to explore the possibilities of using drones for deliveries.  (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)
BONN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 09: A quadcopter drone arrives with a small delivery at Deutsche Post headquarters on December 9, 2013 in Bonn, Germany. Deutsche Post is testing deliveries of medicine from a pharmacy in Bonn in an examination into the viability of using drones for deliveries of small packages over short distances. U.S. online retailer Amazon has also started its intention to explore the possibilities of using drones for deliveries. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

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The Federal Aviation Administration released long-awaited draft regulations for the commercial operations of small unmanned aircraft. Before now, it's been a bit of a wild west scenario on the skies.

The new rules establish requirements for drone operators - they must be 17 years old, pass an aeronautical knowledge test, and hold an FAA UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) operator certificate. And, most notably, the rules state that a commercial drone cannot be operated outside the visual line-of-sight of its operator. That virtually eliminates drone-based delivery of goods - at least for now.

Take Two's favorite drone expert Greg McNeal has been writing about this for Forbes Magazine, and he joined the show to talk about the new rules and the reaction from businesses such as Amazon.