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The Net Neutrality debate is far from over




At the start of a meeting to decide the issue of net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, center, holds hands with FCC Commissioners Mignon Clyburn, left, and Jessica Rosenworcel at the FCC headquarters Thursday.
At the start of a meeting to decide the issue of net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, center, holds hands with FCC Commissioners Mignon Clyburn, left, and Jessica Rosenworcel at the FCC headquarters Thursday.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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Internet access is "too important to let broadband providers be the ones making the rules." 

That's what Federal Communications Commission chair Tom Wheeler said yesterday as his agency voted to regulate broadband Internet service as a public utility. Net Neutrality is intended to keep the Internet from being split into pay-to-play fast lanes for those who can afford it and something much slower for everybody else. Brian Fung from the Washington Post joins Alex Cohen for a discussion about the decision and what we can expect for Net Neutrality, next.

And while yesterday's decision was an important one, let's face it - the idea of actually watching an FCC hearing on Net Neutrality sounds a little boring and wonky, right? Not if you were watching it play out on The Verge. Adi Robertson is a reporter with The Verge and she joins Alex  to talk about how they made the FCC seem interesting.