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LA playwright travels more than 5K miles for King Richard III's reburial




The coffin containing the remains of King Richard III is carried by gun carriage as it processes through Leicester City centre ahead of internment at Leicester Cathedral in Leicester, England, Sunday, March 22, 2015. The skeleton of King Richard III was discovered in 2012 in the foundations of Greyfriars Church, Leicester, 500 years after he was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field. Richard III’s casket will lie inside Leicester Cathedral for public viewing for three days until 26 March when he will be re-interred during a service. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)
The coffin containing the remains of King Richard III is carried by gun carriage as it processes through Leicester City centre ahead of internment at Leicester Cathedral in Leicester, England, Sunday, March 22, 2015. The skeleton of King Richard III was discovered in 2012 in the foundations of Greyfriars Church, Leicester, 500 years after he was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field. Richard III’s casket will lie inside Leicester Cathedral for public viewing for three days until 26 March when he will be re-interred during a service. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)
Rui Vieira/AP

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In England, thousands of people have stacked long lines this week to view the reburial of King Richard III, one of the most notorious and controversial figures in English history.

His scheming and murderous rise to power is shown in Shakespeare's famous play and the role has been played by Al Pacino, Kevin Spacey and Ian McKellen. Here's McKellen in the 1995 film:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjJEXkbeL-o

But there's long been efforts to take a different look at his role in history as a leader who pioneered legal aid and judicial changes in the courts. Those efforts only intensified after remains were discovered in 2012 beneath a car park.

That's sparked renewed interest in his life and led to the events this week, which has drawn people from across the world.

One of them is Nance Crawford, a resident of Los Angeles and a playwright, who made the trip this week.

"It's almost a life-changing event," said Crawford, a member of the Richard III Society, after attending a private ceremony yesterday. "I'm so overwhelmed right now, I'm really having a hard time taking all of this in."