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A look back at Robert E. Lee's surrender 150 years ago today




The graves of a Union soldier with Confederate soldiers are shown at sunset at the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park April 7, 2015 in Appomattox, Virginia. Today is the 150th anniversary of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia to Union forces commanded by General Ulysses S. Grant in the McLean House at Appomattox, Virginia. The surrender marked the beginning of the end of the American Civil War in 1865. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
The graves of a Union soldier with Confederate soldiers are shown at sunset at the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park April 7, 2015 in Appomattox, Virginia. Today is the 150th anniversary of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia to Union forces commanded by General Ulysses S. Grant in the McLean House at Appomattox, Virginia. The surrender marked the beginning of the end of the American Civil War in 1865. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Win McNamee/Getty Images

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150 years ago today, on April 9th 1865, General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appamattox Court House, Virginia.

While other battles were fought and other surrenders followed, the day has come to mark the symbolic end of the Civil War.

It brought an end to slavery and established legal equality for former slaves. Yet looking back, many wonder how far we've truly come in terms of racial equality.

UCLA history professor Brenda Stevenson joined Take Two to discuss the significance of today's anniversary. Stevenson is author of the forthcoming book "What is Slavery?"